Highlights: the best and brightest fixtures, selected by architects and designers

Furniture By Mariano Fortuny

“I love the nuts-and-bolts-ness of this floor lamp. The assembly is very straightforward, but the proportion is beautiful,” declares David Ling. According to the New York architect, this icon “could act as a contrast in tall residential spaces. It’s so sculptural, it’s sure to make a strong impression.”

Lighting Furniture Art - Arco by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for Flos

Lighting Furniture Art – Arco by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni for Flos

Hot Achille Furniture by Ingo Maurer

Why do I love this lamp?” ponders New York designer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz. “Because it can be used in any interior, modern or old-world. Because you can barely see it–all you see is the light source. Because it takes up no room. And, most of all, because of its gorgeous wonderful design.”

Lighting Furniture Art 2

Lighting Furniture Art 2

Le Michel Furniture by Niermann Weeks

“This is a terrific reinterpretation of the ’30s Jean-Michel Frank design,” enthuses Nestor Santa-Cruz of Skidmore, Owing & Merrill in Washington, D.C. “It goes well in residential and commercial settings, modern and traditional environments. It’s also one of the best deals for the style.”

Lighting Furniture Art 3 - Custom shade by Fernando Santangelo and Sandra Santos for Trans-Luxe

Lighting Furniture Art 3 – Custom shade by Fernando Santangelo and Sandra Santos for Trans-Luxe

Custom shade Furniture by Fernando Santangelo and Sandra Santos for Trans-Luxe

Shamir Shah was pleased to discover easy access to quality craftsmanship–Santangelo and Santos occupy studio space in the same building. “They both have amazing versatility,” says the New York architect, who has used a number of variations on this classic hanging lamp. “It has a really nice quality of diffused light and helps anchor a table in a large space.”

Lighting Furniture Art 5 - Pacific Heights Petite by Barbara Barry for Boyd Lighting

Lighting Furniture Art 5 – Pacific Heights Petite by Barbara Barry for Boyd Lighting

Fucsia 1 Furniture by Achille Castiglioni for Flos

Ambient, indirect, and translucent light make this lamp a favorite of architect David Ling. “The fixture becomes a sculptural spark,” he elaborates. Then there’s the added value of “providing light and eye candy at the same time.”

Lighting Furniture Art 7

Lighting Furniture Art 7

Juan Carlos Arcila-Duque is still wowed by this favorite from the 1960s. “I like how it’s engineered from an architectural point of view,” says the Miami designer, who finds Arco’s versatility equally arresting. “The design complements so many styles. It always makes a solo-act statement.”

 

 

Precious details drew Shamir Shah to this item. According to him, “The felt topstitching on the edge a predictable shade a little twist.”

Pascualina Furniture by Pascual Salvador for Tango

This clamp-on lamp is perfectly proportional. “It puts out beautiful light, too,” says New York designer Laura Bohn. “We’ll buy a whole bunch and distribute them over library shelves.”

Halogen Pharmacy by Holkotter

“The main thing I like is the pure A-line shape of this floor lamp. And it’s very low, just the right height for next to a chair. Most are too tall,” explains Laura Bohn. She also lauds the finish options and the streamlined, switchless design–simply twist the stem to turn the fixture on and off.

Sometimes, there’s nothing like your own. Says Los Angeles designer Barbara Barry, “I design lamps based on the philosophy that they’re vehicles for light, not decoration, so my pieces are the ultimate in simplicity.” What makes this table lamp her ongoing favorite? “It just slips in, without creating tension.”

Lighting Furniture Art 8

Lighting Furniture Art 8

Tizio by Richard Sapper for Artemide

“What can be said about this iconic piece that’s not been mentioned before?” muses London designer Bobby Pathak. “For me, it epitomizes the elegance of simplicity.”

Question by Jordan Mozer for Jordan Mozer and Associates

For architect Jordan Mozer, the answer is a sinuous table lamp in his very own Chicago bedroom. This version, in resin and cold-cast aluminum, derives from one he created for a 1991 restaurant project. (The original was made of sheet copper). As Mozer puts it, “I like lamps that are organically sculptural objects in their own right.”

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